Gun Rights

Posted by Jack with my thanks to Harold

Given how far California has gone to suppress any sort of gun ownership,  everyone, gun owners or not, should support the NRA and CAL GUNS.   For they are the only people fighting for our rights and using common sense.

If there is any banning to be done, then it ought to be the legislators who don’t know the first thing about guns and have formed their opinions based on false and misleading information.

On Monday, June 19, the NRA and CRPA’s legal team submitted a joint-letter to the California Department of Justice (DOJ) and Office of Administrative law demanding that the regulations be withdrawn or not approved as the regulations exceed DOJ’s regulatory authority.

As previously reported last month, the DOJ submitted draft regulations regarding “Assault Weapons” to the Office of Administrative Law (“OAL”) for final publication in the California Code of Regulations (CCR). To learn more about the assault weapon regulations you can watch the webinar hosted by NRA and CRPA’s legal team by clicking here.

Update on Duncan v. Becerra 

Last Tuesday, June 13, our legal team was in court to argue a motion for a preliminary injunction in Duncan v. Becerra, a federal lawsuit supported by the National Rifle Association, challenging California’s restrictions against standard capacity magazines.

California’s new restriction against the mere “possession” of magazines capable of holding more than ten rounds goes into effect July 1, 2017.   If granted, the motion will suspend the enforcement of this restriction while the case is pending.

To stay up-to-date on DOJ regulations, the Duncan case, as well as other important Second Amendment issues in California, be sure to subscribe to NRA email alerts or check the California Stand and Fight webpage.

 

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11 Responses to Gun Rights

  1. Chris says:

    While I continue to support universal background checks, I have come to favor gun rights more and more over the past few years. The recent attempts by congressional Democrats to ban guns for people on the no-fly list, and their temper tantrum afterward, was shameful. No one should have a constitutional right taken away based on mere suspicion.

    That said, I cannot support the NRA as I think their opposition to background checks and support of guns in our schools is extreme. I also find their silence on Philando Castile to be hugely hypocritical. Castile was killed by a police officer for being a lawful gun owner and for being honest about that fact with the officer. The NRA should have been screaming for justice in this case. The fact that they expressed no outrage against the officer makes their constant wailing about the government oppressing legal gun owners seem empty and hollow.

    • Tina says:

      The meme that the NRA doesn’t support background checks is a disingenuous distortion.

      Wayne LaPierre is quoted on the issue in a Washington Times article:

      “The best-kept secret is that the National Instant Check System wouldn’t exist at all if it weren’t for the NRA,” Mr. LaPierre said. “It’s true. Back in the ‘90s, President Clinton forced passage of a mandatory waiting period on every handgun purchase in America. Not a background check — a wait.

      “But NRA said as soon as the technology was available, their wait had to be replaced by an instant background check, done by the dealer, at the point of sale,” he said. “NRA supported it, NRA got the votes and NRA got it passed.”

      The NRA position is that compliance is the problem:

      Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president and CEO of the National Rifle Association, says in a video that without the NRA there would be no federal instant checks and that expanding a broken system won’t fix the problem.

      Mr. LaPierre said 38 states submit less than 80 percent of their felony convictions into the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, leaving more than 7 million felony convictions “in the dark.”

      “The only thing the average American has heard about background checks is the absolute fallacy that what we need is more,” Mr. LaPierre said in the video. “The system is only as good as the records within it, and the records only get submitted if the politicians demand it.”

      As with many regulations, enforcement isn’t consistent or monitored effectively. (the bureaucracy again)…and law enforcement/the courts have bigger crimes to address.

      Also you’ve characterized the law as having a “loop hole” giving the impression that at gun shows dealers can by-pass the law. The NRA makes it’s distinction based on what they call “hobbyist and collectors” people who trade and collect weapons and don’t engage in the retail sale of weapons. These are not people wh would attempt to run guns in black market style.

      Criminals and crazy people cannot be legislated out no matter how much you may want it…sorry…it’s not going to work…ever.

      The NRA doesn’t support “guns in our schools,” which makes it sound as if they favor stockpiles of weapons casually handed out upon request. They support school districts having the choice to allow teachers who are trained and licensed to carry IF they choose or school districts to have the choice to have armed guards on site IF they choose. The NRA isn’t a legislative body. They advise, based on experience, facts, and history. (Example: The two armed women on Rep. Scalises detail stopped the shooter and in doing so prevented what could have been a much worse disaster. Murder rates have dropped as concealed carry numbers increase.

      See related articles here.

      “The NRA should have been screaming for justice in this case.”

      And join those who choose to convict in the court of public opinion?

      The case was tried in court. Officer Jeronimo Yanez was acquitted – CBS News.

      The NRA has run ads featuring a black woman (Detroit or Chicago) who marched with MLK in Selma and has been held hostage by violence in her city. How many civil rights organizations spoke out in support of her in their democrat run crime riddled cities? (exactly zero) But the NRA gave her a voice.

      Do you hold the democrat leaders in Chicago and other cities responsible for the mostly racial mass shootings in their cities? Do you call out the party for ignoring their hypocrisy and political games? Do you call out civil rights organizations for not being “outraged” by the black on black carnage?

      • Harold says:

        There is also the one thing that stands out , the officer clearly told Castile:
        ” not to reach for the weapon’,
        as well as
        “do not pull it out”
        Clearly the officer could not recognize what was in Castile’s hand or what he was reaching for.

        Had Castile followed those instructions and STOPPED his motion as directed by the officer, he would be alive today.

        Honest about carrying a weapon is important as well as nesscery , but you have to realize once you acknowledge the weapon you now have heighten any situation and need to slow down and follow instructions, SLOWLY… Cancelled carry is just that, a gun on your person hidden from public view, you start to reach for something after the officer is alerted, you best wait for the officers consent.

        Cancelled carry people I know, realize the peril any officer is in at any time and with any stop.

        They understand to keep their hands in sight, turn the interior lights on if it helps brighten the car interior, hand the officer their ID and Cancelled permit at the same time and tell the officer the location of the weapon as you do so, and then wait for the officer to instruct you what they want you to do next, had Castile done so , I believe he would not be dead today , the officer was clearly OK until Castile did not follow the officers instruction (More and more today we hear about excessive force by the police, and then find out it was a result of the suspects lack of following direction of authority)

        That Officer was clearly shaken by the results, and thankfully no one else was hit by a round directed at Castile, Castile put everyone in that car at risk, and it could have been prevented if he just listened to what the officer was telling him at the time.

        The NRA had nothing to do with this, and if anything, I wager they will make a strong effort to refresh their membership/ and public of how to conduct oneself while carrying.

        The whole idea of the NRA being at fault in any way is wrong in my opinion, the goal of the NRA is about gun safety first and foremost. Fighting for preservation of our second amendment rights is a result of anti-gun politicians and their relentless drive to eliminate gun ownership.

        • Chris says:

          I didn’t say the NRA was “at fault,” Harold. My argument was that it is strange of them not to comment on this case and speak on Castile’s behalf.

          Castile said he was not reaching for his gun. He had his wife and daughter in the car. The officer had previously told him to give him his insurance, which is what he was reaching for. Why would he tell the officer he had a gun if that’s what he was reaching for? The officer should have realized that didn’t make any sense.

          You are right that there are things Castile could have done, but the primary responsibility to de-escalate a situation like this one lies with the officer. That is what police are supposed to be trained for. I don’t get the idea that citizens are supposed to be more prepared to handle a situation like this than an officer of the law. The officer completely misread this situation and ended up shooting four bullets into Castile–it was completely unnecessary.

          Many conservatives have spoken out against the verdict. I won’t say that I know for a fact the officer should have been convicted, but morally, he bears responsibility for botching the situation and ending Castile’s life based on a simple mistake.

          • Harold says:

            With privilege comes responsibility, similar to driving and not driving drunk.
            Both driving and gun carry require a license, after passing a knowledge test as well as a skills test, but some do not respect the privilege, or respect it’s limits. That’s what happened with Castile.

            I flatly disagree with your summation that the officer had more responsibility : “the primary responsibility to de-escalate a situation like this one lies with the officer.”

            Your rewording of one of my statements that mentioned concealed carry people need to have as much of a awareness of what the situation could lead to as any officer, was changed completely by you injecting into my statement the word MORE. I never suggested that, I said they need to aware, being MORE aware is not even close to what I said.
            Chris opinion, not mine: “that citizens are supposed to be “MORE” prepared to handle a situation like this than an officer of the law” is not even close to what I said.

            My point was clear, follow the directions of the officer, if he says stop, then stop, no officer can read your mindset, and he has no idea at this point where Castile was carrying his weapon, anyone can clearly spot a sidearm on a officer, the concealed carry person has the advantage of a hidden firearm.

            I don’t believe I misinterpreted your reference one bit as to why the NRA isn’t more involved
            Chris you wrote: “I also find their (NRA) silence on Philando Castile to be hugely hypocritical.
            You also went on to with: “The fact that they (NRA) expressed no outrage against the officer makes their constant wailing about the government oppressing legal gun owners seem empty and hollow.

            You words were clear in my mind that the NRA had some fault by NOT speaking up against a legal shooting, it was you directing a negative comment toward the NRA and it isn’t even close to the truth of what they are about and do to make gun owners more conscious about gun safety, either at home or on the streets.

            I also noticed once more you try to assign blame where it is not warranted with your statement of : “The officer completely misread this situation and ended up shooting four bullets into Castile–it was completely unnecessary.

            No Chris, what was “unnecessary” was Castile’s refusal to obey a direct order to stop, when people disregard a order of authority, it can only lead to a higher escalation in any situation.

      • Chris says:

        Tina, the National Instant Check System was launched twenty years ago. I won’t deny that the NRA used to do good work; my father used to be a member. But they no longer support the same type of sensible gun control measures they used to. Their support for background checks twenty years ago doesn’t change the fact that they oppose them now.

        As for lack of enforcement, the NRA has led the charge for de-fanging the ATF, and has been wildly successful at doing so. So I can’t take their professed desire for better enforcement seriously.

        You are wrong that gun runners don’t take advantage of gun shows.

        http://web.archive.org/web/20030331095704/http://www.atf.gov/pub/fire-explo_pub/pdf/followingthegun_internet.pdf

        And of course, the Columbine shooters got some of their guns by having a third party buy them from a gun show. She did not know why they asked her to do this, and she says that if she had had to complete a background check, she wouldn’t have done it.

        The majority of guns used in crimes are not bought at gun shows, but this is still a loophole that needs to be closed.

        The NRA doesn’t support “guns in our schools,” which makes it sound as if they favor stockpiles of weapons casually handed out upon request. They support school districts having the choice to allow teachers who are trained and licensed to carry IF they choose or school districts to have the choice to have armed guards on site IF they choose.

        That’s…literally guns in our schools. I don’t agree that the phrase implies “stockpiles.” It means exactly what it says.

        Murder rates have dropped as concealed carry numbers increase.

        I support concealed carry, but not at schools.

        And join those who choose to convict in the court of public opinion?

        Has the NRA never expressed an opinion about a court case? Most advocacy groups do.

        The case was tried in court. Officer Jeronimo Yanez was acquitted – CBS News.

        Yes, I’m aware. You don’t automatically accept every court ruling as being the correct one, and neither do I.

        The NRA has run ads featuring a black woman (Detroit or Chicago) who marched with MLK in Selma and has been held hostage by violence in her city. How many civil rights organizations spoke out in support of her in their democrat run crime riddled cities? (exactly zero) But the NRA gave her a voice.

        Good for them.

        Do you hold the democrat leaders in Chicago and other cities responsible for the mostly racial mass shootings in their cities? Do you call out the party for ignoring their hypocrisy and political games? Do you call out civil rights organizations for not being “outraged” by the black on black carnage?

        What do you mean by “racial mass shootings?” I’m unaware of any mass shootings where race was a component, outside of Dylann Roof in South Carolina. There is a lot of gun violence in inner cities, and yes, the leaders of those cities are responsible for finding solutions for them.

  2. Peggy says:

    Heard an interesting if not valid discussion to make gun laws uniform in all states since it is a right granted in our nation’s Constitution.

    This would allow conceal carry permits to be issued by the feds and honored in all states, just like current drivers’ licenses and marriages.

    In fact it makes more sense since neither driving a car or getting married is mentioned in our Constitution. But, being able to own a gun is and even has it’s very own amendment.

    The issue was brought up after the attack on the republicans at the baseball field. One of our reps has a cc permit, but isn’t allowed to have it in his position when he enters DC from his home state. Every time he arrives the capitol police meet him at the border, take possession of his gun, drive it to the capital building where they return it to him. He is allowed to have it within the building, but when he leaves he goes through the whole process in reverse.

    • Chris says:

      Heard an interesting if not valid discussion to make gun laws uniform in all states since it is a right granted in our nation’s Constitution.

      This would seem to set a dangerous precedent, Peggy. For example, abortion has been ruled a constitutional right; if the federal government under a Republican could strike down all gun regulations in every state, the federal government under a Democrat could strike down all abortion regulations in every state as well.

      • Peggy says:

        Chris, you know as well as I do Congress writes laws and if they aren’t constitutional the supreme court will reverse it. What are you talking about striking down state abort regulations? The SC has already taken that right away from them.

        I stand by my argument that our national laws are supreme to state laws. The same should apply to the 2nd Amendment as does the 1st, 1oth and all of the rest.

        • Chris says:

          What are you talking about striking down state abort regulations? The SC has already taken that right away from them.

          No, they have not. Regulations on abortion vary from state to state. The SC may strike down individual regulations that violate Roe v. Wade, but states are allowed some leeway there. The same is true of gun control regulations: individual ones can be struck down by the SC, but they can’t just say states can’t make any regulations at all.

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